Comments on: One Man’s Lazy is Another’s Man’s Peace /2010/07/27/one-mans-lazy-is-anothers-mans-peace/ Sun, 29 Aug 2010 19:53:38 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.0.1 By: New Orleans Movers /2010/07/27/one-mans-lazy-is-anothers-mans-peace/comment-page-1/#comment-6000 New Orleans Movers Tue, 24 Aug 2010 19:42:00 +0000 /?p=1703#comment-6000 It's not so bad that people in Louisiana like to take their time and enjoy life. Maybe some of the other states can learn from them. It’s not so bad that people in Louisiana like to take their time and enjoy life. Maybe some of the other states can learn from them.

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By: Nola /2010/07/27/one-mans-lazy-is-anothers-mans-peace/comment-page-1/#comment-5910 Nola Sat, 31 Jul 2010 22:13:38 +0000 /?p=1703#comment-5910 Pete, Dan Baum makes reference to the Caribbean culture in his forward as well: "New Orleanians are hard to offend. Stop thinking of New Orleans as the worst-organized city in the United States, they often say. Start thinking of it as the best-organized city in the Caribbean." I still say that New Orleans, when compared to other AMERICAN cities, doesn't fit on the scale. Try measuring us to European countries. I think we'd fall more in the norm there, where such "leisure" is perceived as having higher value and thus not considered as "non=working." It's not as if New Orleanians are known for being Coach Potatoes. Pete, Dan Baum makes reference to the Caribbean culture in his forward as well: “New Orleanians are hard to offend. Stop thinking of New Orleans as the worst-organized city in the United States, they often say. Start thinking of it as the best-organized city in the Caribbean.”

I still say that New Orleans, when compared to other AMERICAN cities, doesn’t fit on the scale. Try measuring us to European countries. I think we’d fall more in the norm there, where such “leisure” is perceived as having higher value and thus not considered as “non=working.” It’s not as if New Orleanians are known for being Coach Potatoes.

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By: Tweets that mention NOLA Notes » Blog Archive » One Man’s Lazy is Another’s Man’s Peace -- Topsy.com /2010/07/27/one-mans-lazy-is-anothers-mans-peace/comment-page-1/#comment-5909 Tweets that mention NOLA Notes » Blog Archive » One Man’s Lazy is Another’s Man’s Peace -- Topsy.com Sat, 31 Jul 2010 22:13:18 +0000 /?p=1703#comment-5909 [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Pontchartrain Pete, Aleece Langford. Aleece Langford said: RT @Pontchartrain: Some more thoughts on why Business Week thinks we're such lazy bastids here in NOLA. http://is.gd/dVqeP [...] [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Pontchartrain Pete, Aleece Langford. Aleece Langford said: RT @Pontchartrain: Some more thoughts on why Business Week thinks we're such lazy bastids here in NOLA. http://is.gd/dVqeP [...]

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By: pete /2010/07/27/one-mans-lazy-is-anothers-mans-peace/comment-page-1/#comment-5908 pete Sat, 31 Jul 2010 21:04:23 +0000 /?p=1703#comment-5908 I think some interesting thoughts that mesh with this whole deal were expressed by urban planner Andres Duany, who was active in the area post-K. This is from <a href="http://www.insidenorthside.com/08septOct/0908duany.html" rel="nofollow">an article about his participation in a planning session on the Northshore</a>. <blockquote>Raised in Cuba, Duany came to recognize the city as more Caribbean in nature than American. “[W]hen seen through the lens of the Caribbean, New Orleans is not among the most haphazard, poorest or misgoverned American cities, but rather the most organized, wealthiest, cleanest, and competently governed of the Caribbean cities,” he wrote in a post-storm essay. Duany believes the city’s pre-storm housing situation is responsible for much of the city’s culture. Cheap housing allowed “[T]he possibility of leisure. There was time to create the fabulously complex Creole dishes that simmer forever; there was time to practice music, to play it live rather than from recordings, and time to listen to it. There was time to make costumes and to parade; there was time to party and to tell stories; there was time to spend all day marking the passing of friends.”</blockquote> Now, that's still a little condescending and ignores the fact that our food, music, art and customs developed despite the majority of New Orleanians, throughout the city's existence, engaged in some sort of day-to-day commercial toil (i.e., had jobs). But it's still a valid point that highlights how strong the city's connection with the Caribbean was. We can't discount the role played by New Orleans' contacts with the French colony of San Dominque in the early days of its existence, and by the thousands of colonists exiled to the city from there between 1803 and 1809. I think some interesting thoughts that mesh with this whole deal were expressed by urban planner Andres Duany, who was active in the area post-K. This is from an article about his participation in a planning session on the Northshore.

Raised in Cuba, Duany came to recognize the city as more Caribbean in nature than American. “[W]hen seen through the lens of the Caribbean, New Orleans is not among the most haphazard, poorest or misgoverned American cities, but rather the most organized, wealthiest, cleanest, and competently governed of the Caribbean cities,” he wrote in a post-storm essay.

Duany believes the city’s pre-storm housing situation is responsible for much of the city’s culture. Cheap housing allowed “[T]he possibility of leisure. There was time to create the fabulously complex Creole dishes that simmer forever; there was time to practice music, to play it live rather than from recordings, and time to listen to it. There was time to make costumes and to parade; there was time to party and to tell stories; there was time to spend all day marking the passing of friends.”

Now, that’s still a little condescending and ignores the fact that our food, music, art and customs developed despite the majority of New Orleanians, throughout the city’s existence, engaged in some sort of day-to-day commercial toil (i.e., had jobs). But it’s still a valid point that highlights how strong the city’s connection with the Caribbean was. We can’t discount the role played by New Orleans’ contacts with the French colony of San Dominque in the early days of its existence, and by the thousands of colonists exiled to the city from there between 1803 and 1809.

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By: SoMo /2010/07/27/one-mans-lazy-is-anothers-mans-peace/comment-page-1/#comment-5906 SoMo Thu, 29 Jul 2010 16:50:20 +0000 /?p=1703#comment-5906 Like I said elsewhere they don't get it and never will, because it is not in their best interest to get it. They are better than us and that is all they want to see. Like I said elsewhere they don’t get it and never will, because it is not in their best interest to get it. They are better than us and that is all they want to see.
SoMo´s last blog ..Children Bill of RightsMy ComLuv Profile

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By: Editilla~New Orleans Ladder /2010/07/27/one-mans-lazy-is-anothers-mans-peace/comment-page-1/#comment-5900 Editilla~New Orleans Ladder Thu, 29 Jul 2010 01:25:25 +0000 /?p=1703#comment-5900 Nice post, thank you. Baum is a fop. I have never understood peoples' infatuation with his bourgeois naivete. Furthermore, Business Week is worse than fop: it is Yankee. I understand perfectly the editorial motivation behind such a Business Rag tagging Louisiana thus, in the midst of yet another man-made disaster/attack on our people, to wit: the show ain't over until the Fat Lady Of Justice Sings in Court. I find it dispiriting indeed to witness mass media wielded with such a thorough corporate saturation. News is not News anymore, it is PR Studies. Why vote for Congressional funding for such a lazy Katrina-handout state as Louisiana? Less land means less States Rights. Bang. And, it is far cheaper to float it than truck it or pipe it. Sounds simple I know. But what do we see? Charolette, I'm with you... but from everything I've ever seen "normal" in New Orleans IS sexy. The rest of the country has gone to Mall in a Hand Basket. Nice post, thank you.
Baum is a fop. I have never understood peoples’ infatuation with his bourgeois naivete. Furthermore, Business Week is worse than fop: it is Yankee. I understand perfectly the editorial motivation behind such a Business Rag tagging Louisiana thus, in the midst of yet another man-made disaster/attack on our people, to wit: the show ain’t over until the Fat Lady Of Justice Sings in Court. I find it dispiriting indeed to witness mass media wielded with such a thorough corporate saturation. News is not News anymore, it is PR Studies. Why vote for Congressional funding for such a lazy Katrina-handout state as Louisiana?
Less land means less States Rights. Bang. And, it is far cheaper to float it than truck it or pipe it. Sounds simple I know. But what do we see?

Charolette, I’m with you… but from everything I’ve ever seen “normal” in New Orleans IS sexy. The rest of the country has gone to Mall in a Hand Basket.
Editilla~New Orleans Ladder´s last blog ..My ComLuv Profile

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By: Charlotte /2010/07/27/one-mans-lazy-is-anothers-mans-peace/comment-page-1/#comment-5899 Charlotte Thu, 29 Jul 2010 00:54:11 +0000 /?p=1703#comment-5899 I'm put in mind of a comment I passed to a friend about Treme: "People in the rest of the country must think all we do is drink, smoke and party." And he said, "Yeah and all I do is work all day then go home and renovate". People here are like people everywhere - we have normal lives, work normal jobs, cut the grass, clean the house, etc. in addition to celebrating Mardi Gras, crawfish boils and second lines. Why is it so hard people to see/believe that? I think it's partially because of the way we are portrayed on TV and in movies. I guess normal isn't sexy. I’m put in mind of a comment I passed to a friend about Treme: “People in the rest of the country must think all we do is drink, smoke and party.” And he said, “Yeah and all I do is work all day then go home and renovate”.
People here are like people everywhere – we have normal lives, work normal jobs, cut the grass, clean the house, etc. in addition to celebrating Mardi Gras, crawfish boils and second lines.
Why is it so hard people to see/believe that? I think it’s partially because of the way we are portrayed on TV and in movies. I guess normal isn’t sexy.
Charlotte´s last blog ..32 Days 2 Year 5- A Photographic JourneyMy ComLuv Profile

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By: Pistolette /2010/07/27/one-mans-lazy-is-anothers-mans-peace/comment-page-1/#comment-5898 Pistolette Wed, 28 Jul 2010 13:10:46 +0000 /?p=1703#comment-5898 Good post. I blogged about this too. I just thought the article was poorly researched and written too quickly. Plus, it's almost comical how wrong they get it. They'd do better to write about us as though we are a foreign country rather than Americans. At least then they'd approach us as different, rather than now, where they approach - expecting us to be the same as them. Good post. I blogged about this too. I just thought the article was poorly researched and written too quickly. Plus, it’s almost comical how wrong they get it. They’d do better to write about us as though we are a foreign country rather than Americans. At least then they’d approach us as different, rather than now, where they approach – expecting us to be the same as them.
Pistolette´s last blog ..The Empathic Civilization snap Stay With Me NowMy ComLuv Profile

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By: Kevin /2010/07/27/one-mans-lazy-is-anothers-mans-peace/comment-page-1/#comment-5897 Kevin Wed, 28 Jul 2010 01:59:35 +0000 /?p=1703#comment-5897 Very nicely thought out; very nicely written. With the oil disaster, I'm having that sinking post-Katrina feeling that south Louisiana and the rest of the country are speaking two completely different languages, trying to communicate across two completely separate sets of morés. Very nicely thought out; very nicely written.

With the oil disaster, I’m having that sinking post-Katrina feeling that south Louisiana and the rest of the country are speaking two completely different languages, trying to communicate across two completely separate sets of morés.

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By: suz /2010/07/27/one-mans-lazy-is-anothers-mans-peace/comment-page-1/#comment-5896 suz Wed, 28 Jul 2010 01:12:35 +0000 /?p=1703#comment-5896 Don'tcha just hate that arrogance of the assumption that your experience is just like anywhere else in the country? I think an awful lot of Northerners feel like Southerners are lazy, when we're just different. D and I just spent almost a week up in Philadelphia, where he's from, and there were so many little snide comments about the south, our lifestyle, our willingness (or lack thereof) to drive all over creation to visit them during OUR weeklong "vacation" up there, when they'd just had 3 weeks vacation at a lake. I think a lot of it is ignorant assumption. Or stereotyping. Don’tcha just hate that arrogance of the assumption that your experience is just like anywhere else in the country? I think an awful lot of Northerners feel like Southerners are lazy, when we’re just different. D and I just spent almost a week up in Philadelphia, where he’s from, and there were so many little snide comments about the south, our lifestyle, our willingness (or lack thereof) to drive all over creation to visit them during OUR weeklong “vacation” up there, when they’d just had 3 weeks vacation at a lake.

I think a lot of it is ignorant assumption. Or stereotyping.

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